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theatlantic:

The Gettysburg Address at 150 — and Lincoln’s Impromptu Words the Night Before

One-hundred and fifty years ago today, Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address. It has been celebrated by successive generations of Americans ever since. One of my favorite retrospectives was published back in 1894 in The Century Magazine, where John G. Nicolay set the scene in Gettysburg the night before the now-famous speech.
"Except during its days of battle the little town of Gettysburg had never been so full of people," he wrote. "After the usual supper hour the streets literally swarmed with visitors, and the stirring music of regimental bands and patriotic glee-clubs sounded in many directions. With material so abundant, and enthusiasm so plentiful, a serenading party soon organized itself to call on prominent personages for impromptu speeches, and of course the President could not escape. The crowd persisted in calling him out, but Mr. Lincoln showed himself only long enough to utter the few commonplace excuses which politeness required."
Read more. [Image: Mr. T in DC/Flickr]

theatlantic:

The Gettysburg Address at 150 — and Lincoln’s Impromptu Words the Night Before

One-hundred and fifty years ago today, Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address. It has been celebrated by successive generations of Americans ever since. One of my favorite retrospectives was published back in 1894 in The Century Magazine, where John G. Nicolay set the scene in Gettysburg the night before the now-famous speech.

"Except during its days of battle the little town of Gettysburg had never been so full of people," he wrote. "After the usual supper hour the streets literally swarmed with visitors, and the stirring music of regimental bands and patriotic glee-clubs sounded in many directions. With material so abundant, and enthusiasm so plentiful, a serenading party soon organized itself to call on prominent personages for impromptu speeches, and of course the President could not escape. The crowd persisted in calling him out, but Mr. Lincoln showed himself only long enough to utter the few commonplace excuses which politeness required."

Read more. [Image: Mr. T in DC/Flickr]

12 notes

""If by a ‘Liberal’ they mean someone who looks ahead and not behind, someone who welcomes new ideas without rigid reactions, someone who cares about the welfare of the people — their health, their housing, their schools, their jobs, their civil rights, and their civil liberties — someone who believes we can break through the stalemate and suspicions that grip us in our policies abroad, if that is what they mean by a ‘Liberal,’ then I’m proud to say I’m a ‘Liberal.’" - John F. Kennedy, acceptance of the New York liberal party nomination, 1960

""If by a ‘Liberal’ they mean someone who looks ahead and not behind, someone who welcomes new ideas without rigid reactions, someone who cares about the welfare of the people — their health, their housing, their schools, their jobs, their civil rights, and their civil liberties — someone who believes we can break through the stalemate and suspicions that grip us in our policies abroad, if that is what they mean by a ‘Liberal,’ then I’m proud to say I’m a ‘Liberal.’" - John F. Kennedy, acceptance of the New York liberal party nomination, 1960

Filed under john f kennedy jfk jack kennedy kennedy november 22

109 notes

mrsjohnfkennedy:

Senator John F. Kennedy, front running candidate for the Democratic Presidential nomination talks things over with his brother and campaign manager, Robert Kennedy.

RIP JFK

mrsjohnfkennedy:

Senator John F. Kennedy, front running candidate for the Democratic Presidential nomination talks things over with his brother and campaign manager, Robert Kennedy.

RIP JFK

841 notes

theatlantic:

Photo Essay: 50 Years Ago, The World in 1963

Top: Civil rights leader Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. waves to supporters on the Mall in Washington, D.C. during the “March on Washington,” on August 28, 1963. King said the march was “the greatest demonstration of freedom in the history of the United States.”

Center-left: Thich Quang Duc, a Buddhist monk, burns himself to death on a Saigon street to protest alleged persecution of Buddhists by the South Vietnamese government, on June 11, 1963. (Credit: AP/Malcolm Browne)

Center-right: Firefighters turn their hoses full force on civil rights demonstrators in Birmingham, Alabama, on July 15, 1963. (Credit: AP/Bill Hudson)

Bottom: Three-year-old John F. Kennedy Jr. salutes his father’s casket in Washington on November 25, 1963. Widow Jacqueline Kennedy, center, and daughter Caroline Kennedy are accompanied by the late president’s brothers Senator Edward Kennedy, left, and Attorney General Robert Kennedy. (Credit: AP)

See more.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

10,267 notes

epona:

here’s a screen cap of a correspondence between a woman named telisha cobb and senator campfield, who is at the forefront of tennessee’s “don’t say gay” bill (actually called the classroom protection act), a bill which would require teachers, counselors, etc. to inform parents if their children are gay, or even if they ~appear~ to be gay. (here is some more information about it.) she posted it on her facebook (easier to read!) and is urging others to share it so the word can get out about what an unbelievable asshole this dude is (if it wasn’t already obvious enough). 
in case you’re having trouble reading the screen cap, it says: 
Senator Campfield, I am writing to you as a mother, active citizen and born & raised Tennessean. You are an embarrassment to our great state. Folks all over the country and here in Tennessee are looking at the bills that you are proposing in shock. They are the most ignorant and morally lacking legislation that could be proposed this year. It is clear that you are targeting homosexuals and low income families with hogwash legislation. You need to search your heart, your values and your Christianity to find a better way to represent us as a whole. We will do everything in our power to make sure you are not here in 2014. There are numerous grass root parties that are making their voices heard. 
his super classy response to her email reads: 
You seem to have some serious, deep anger issues. Have you ever thought about therapy? I hear they are doing some wonderful things with medication these days. 
Yours in service, 
Sen. Stacey Campfield 
like come on. you’ve gotta be kidding me here. 
so! if you wouldn’t mind reblogging this and spreading the word, that would be great! telisha wants others to spread this around as much as they possibly can. this is a totally inappropriate and unprofessional way of addressing criticism and more people need to know about this dude and what he’s trying to pull. 

epona:

here’s a screen cap of a correspondence between a woman named telisha cobb and senator campfield, who is at the forefront of tennessee’s “don’t say gay” bill (actually called the classroom protection act), a bill which would require teachers, counselors, etc. to inform parents if their children are gay, or even if they ~appear~ to be gay. (here is some more information about it.) she posted it on her facebook (easier to read!) and is urging others to share it so the word can get out about what an unbelievable asshole this dude is (if it wasn’t already obvious enough). 

in case you’re having trouble reading the screen cap, it says: 

Senator Campfield, 
I am writing to you as a mother, active citizen and born & raised Tennessean. You are an embarrassment to our great state. Folks all over the country and here in Tennessee are looking at the bills that you are proposing in shock. They are the most ignorant and morally lacking legislation that could be proposed this year. It is clear that you are targeting homosexuals and low income families with hogwash legislation. You need to search your heart, your values and your Christianity to find a better way to represent us as a whole. We will do everything in our power to make sure you are not here in 2014. There are numerous grass root parties that are making their voices heard. 

his super classy response to her email reads: 

You seem to have some serious, deep anger issues. Have you ever thought about therapy? I hear they are doing some wonderful things with medication these days. 

Yours in service, 

Sen. Stacey Campfield 

like come on. you’ve gotta be kidding me here. 

so! if you wouldn’t mind reblogging this and spreading the word, that would be great! telisha wants others to spread this around as much as they possibly can. this is a totally inappropriate and unprofessional way of addressing criticism and more people need to know about this dude and what he’s trying to pull. 

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

492 notes

theatlantic:

Why the ‘Citizen Militia’ Theory Is the Worst Pro-Gun Argument Ever

The history of the postbellum South offers another cautionary story of unregulated and extra-legal political violence. The founders of the Ku Klux Klan purported to be defending the rights of the white community against the tyranny of illegitimate Reconstruction governments, black enfranchisement, and federal military occupation. And for several years, the Klan used this rationale to carry out a gruesome campaign of systematic violence, murder, and political intimidation.
War, particularly civil war, is by its nature violent. Official state armies are not immune from the tendency to inflict unjustified violence on civilians. But in America today, this prospect is far more remote, and far less terrifying, than the notion of armed citizens striking out against a perceived enemy, answering to no authority other than their own individual prejudices and passions.
Read more. [Image: Flickr]

theatlantic:

Why the ‘Citizen Militia’ Theory Is the Worst Pro-Gun Argument Ever

The history of the postbellum South offers another cautionary story of unregulated and extra-legal political violence. The founders of the Ku Klux Klan purported to be defending the rights of the white community against the tyranny of illegitimate Reconstruction governments, black enfranchisement, and federal military occupation. And for several years, the Klan used this rationale to carry out a gruesome campaign of systematic violence, murder, and political intimidation.

War, particularly civil war, is by its nature violent. Official state armies are not immune from the tendency to inflict unjustified violence on civilians. But in America today, this prospect is far more remote, and far less terrifying, than the notion of armed citizens striking out against a perceived enemy, answering to no authority other than their own individual prejudices and passions.

Read more. [Image: Flickr]

(via stfuconservatives)